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6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

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6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

Springtime is here and it’s time to get out in the yard. When planting, remember some plants are toxic to dogs and other pets. Here’s a list of items to stay away from:

  • Oleander – It can cause serious issues including gastrointestinal tract irritation and abnormal heart function.
  • Lilies – They are toxic to cats and can cause severe kidney damage.
  • Tulips – The bulbs contain toxins that cause drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions and heart abnormalities.
  • Cocoa mulch – Reacts like chocolate to dogs causing vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors, hyperactivity and seizures.
  • Aloe – Can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia and tremors
  • Azalea – May cause vomiting, diarrhea, weekness, and other issues.

Stay safe this spring and for more information about toxins in plants, visit the ASPCA.

 

 

March 17, 2019 |

6 Reasons To Spay or Neuter Your Dog

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6 Reasons To Spay or Neuter Your Dog

6 Reasons To Spay or Neuter Your Dog

A DogGeek.com exclusive by Teresa Barker

Spaying or neutering your newly adopted dog is one of the first steps in helping them live a long and healthy life. It’s a minimally invasive day surgery that benefits their health, your home life, and the community at large. Here’s a few of the reasons why:

  1. It reduces the risk of uterine infection and cancer (Breast cancer in female dogs and Testicular cancer in male dogs).
  2. It reduces the risk of straying from home in search of a mate, where running in the street and getting hit are a high risk.
  3. It reduces aggressive and territorial behavior, as well as annoying mating rituals such as spraying and trying to escape out the door every time it opens. Also, dominance behaviors with family members will be minimized with sterilization.
  4. It doesn’t hurt them, physically or emotionally. The surgery is done under general anaesthetic and is painless. The recovery consists of keeping them away from the stitches and from jumping or running (again to avoid disrupting the stitches). The only post-surgery requirements are to keep an eye on the stitches and monitor your dog’s activity level. As far as emotional “loss” of reproductive capability, these feelings are complete projections made by humans. When you bring a dog into your family, spaying or neutering allows them to focus on being a part of your established pack, instead of being driven by the urge to reproduce.
  5. It’s one way to help the pet overpopulation epidemic. It’s a fact that millions of dogs, of all ages and breeds, are euthanized every year due to pet overpopulation. Unplanned litters and unsterilized strays perpetuate the cycle that can be prevented by one simple medical procedure.
  6. The cost to spay or neuter is minimal and can even be free. Most cities offer low-cost spay/neuter programs and most shelters sterilize before they allow adoption, so the cost of adoption includes it. Also, it is much cheaper than medical bills related to straying from home, dominant behavior, injuries, or birthing a litter.

Your decision to spay or neuter your new canine family member is one of the best things that you can do for his/her life, as well as, the lives of thousands of other dogs who don’t get adopted. If you are still undecided or need financial help, call your local vet for free advice.

February 25, 2019 |

5 common Valentine’s Day toxins for pets

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Valentine's day

Valentine's day

Valentine’s day is this week and with all the human festivities, there are hidden dangers for your pets. Below are toxic items that you may give or receive on Valentine’s day to hide from your best friend.

  1. Chocolate – Ingestions of more than 0.1 ounces per pound of body weight of dark or semi-sweet chocolate may cause poisoning.
  2. Roses – Although not really poisonous, the thorns can tear through a puppies throat and stomach.
  3. Lillies – Sometimes given instead of roses, lillies contain a toxin that is deadly to pets
  4. Macadamia nuts – Poisonous to dogs but no cats.
  5. Xylitol – The sugar substitute can cause drop in blood sugar as well as liver damage in dogs.

Stay safe this Valentine’s day!

February 4, 2019 |

10 Dangerous Foods for Pets Served on Game Day

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game day foods

Everyone wants the best for their dog’s health. Keep these 16 foods away from them to help keep them safe.

Feb 04

  • Alcohol – Dog’s bodies are not made to break down alcohol like a human’s body. Although you’re getting those sad puppy eyes from your dog, they don’t need a drink of beer!
  • Chocolate – Chocolate can caue seziures, comas and even death. The darker the chocolate, the more concentrated it is and the more dangerous it becomes. An ounce of chocolate can poison a 30 lb dog. And we all know that chocolate is a go-to food for football ;-)
  • Caffeine – Caffeine contains a substance called methylxanthines that can cause vomiting, diarrhea, panding, excessive thirst and urination, hyperactivity and death. So keep the Red Bull’s out of reach!
  • Onions – They destroy a dog’s red blood cells and can cause anemia, weakness and breathing difficulty.
  • Garlic – Large amounts can cause the same issues as onions. This means garlic pizza too!
  • Bread Dough/Raw Yeast – When ingested, the unbaked bread dough expands and can cause bloat. It can also cause alcohol poisoning and gas.
  • Guacamole, Avocados and Pitted Fruits (ie Peache, Pears, etc…) – The pits are toxic to dogs. They can cause difficulty breathing, fluid accumulation in the chest, abdomen, heart or pancreatitis.
  • Macadamia Nuts – Can cause weakness, muscle and nervous-system issues and paralysis.
  • Walnuts – Especially English Walnuts, can cause gastric intestinal upset and can cause obstruction in your dog’s body.
  • Nuts – While most nuts are not poisonous to dogs, they can cause a very upset stomach as their bodies can not easily digest them.

Keep your dog healthy and call the emergency vet if needed.

January 28, 2019 |

Signs of Hypothermia in Dogs

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Signs of Hypothermia in Dogs

Signs of Hypothermia in Dogs

All pets can get hypothermia in cold weather but short haired, young/old, skinny and diabetic dogs are more susceptible. Look for the following signs if you think your dog might be suffering.

  • Sluggishness
  • Shallow, slow breathing
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Excessive whining & shivering
  • Anxiousness
  • Dilated blood vessels
  • Low body temperature
  • Drop in pulse
  • Drop in blood pressure
  • Unconsciousness
  • Death occurs eventually

If your dog shows any of these signs get them to the veterinarian right away.

January 15, 2019 |
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