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Thanksgiving foods that will make your dog sick

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Thanksgiving foods that will make your dog sick

It's officially Thanksgiving when #Nico puts on his "I turkey turkey" shirt!

If you’re like most pet families your best friend is right there besid you while you’re cooking. Whether it’s just a Monday night frozen meal or a Thanksgiving feast Fido doesn’t care, he wants a piece of the action, or turkey. Ensure that your best friend has a great Thanksgiving and doesn’t need a trip to the emergency vet. Here are 5 foods they need to avoid.

  1. Turkey Bones. While everyone’s been told that dogs love to chew on bones, turkey bones are not the ones to give them. Turkey bones are small and can become lodged in your dog’s stomach or throat. They also splinter causing severe damage to the stomach.
  2. Fat Trimmings. Fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are very difficult for dogs to digest. They can also cause pancreatitis which includes vomiting, depression, reluctance to move and abdominal pain as symptoms.
  3. Dough and Batter. The dough can rise in your dog’s stomach and lead to vomiting, bloating and severe pain. The raw eggs can also spread salmonella.
  4. Grapes and Raisins. Both can cause kidney failure in dogs.
  5. Mushrooms. They can damage kedneys, liver and the central nervous system.

Be safe and have a happy Thanksgiving!

November 10, 2018 |

Why Does Your Dog Have an Upset Stomach?

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dog upset stomach

dog upset stomach

A DogGeek.com exclusive

Dog vomiting is a common daily occurrence for many dogs because of the very fast consumption of food by your pooch or may be because he ate something he shouldn’t have. But in some dogs, it may be an indication of any serious hidden illness.

Changing the meal schedule of your dog can be an easy fix to the problem if it isn’t anything serious. But in case this didn’t seem to work, be sure to get your dog good medical attention without any delay as he might have a serious underlying illness.

Frequent vomiting of your dog can lead to intestinal problems, extreme dehydration, and in worse cases, organ failure. It is essential that you do not ignore the vomiting of your dog if it exceeds the frequency of twice per hour, and take him to the vet immediately.

Reasons for Frequent Dog Vomiting

  • Intestinal parasites – These can lead to both diarrhea and vomiting in adult dogs and puppies. Dogs with illnesses, like flue are also known to have minor vomiting.
  • Higher stomach acid – If your dog vomits soon after his meals and the vomiting is yellow in color, it can suggest overproduction of acids and bile in your dog. Feeding small, frequent meals to your dog can help you correct this problem. 
  • Food intolerance – At times, change in dog food can also lead to diarrhea and vomiting as your dog might be intolerant to certain ingredients of this new food. Beef, pork, fish, wheat, and salt are the common foods that can cause food intolerance.
  • Eating Grass – Although it is normal for dogs to eat grass but if your canine friend has eaten too much of grass, it may lead to vomiting.
  • Consuming Non-Food Items – It is natural for dogs to hog upon almost anything that they come across, including garbage, dead animals, plants, and others. Some of these items can be very dangerous when consumed by your dog. To eliminate this habit in dogs, you may want to buy dog supplies or toys to keep them occupied with harmless stuff. 
  • Eating Human Food – Human foods that have a higher content of salt, sugar, and fat, should be given very sparingly to dogs. Frequent consumption of these foods can not only cause vomiting but also lead to chronic illnesses, like diabetes.
  • Hurried or Excessive Drinking or Eating – Drinking or eating hurriedly or in excessive quantities can cause your pooch to vomit soon after the meal. This is especially common among small breeds and puppies.
  • Illnesses – Diseases like cancers, canine parvo, and pancreatitis can also be the reasons for vomiting. Bacterial infections, ear infections, and tumors are also cited as one of the many reasons that can cause vomiting. For better diagnosis, it is essential that you observe the secondary symptoms and any change in behavior of your pooch, apart from vomiting.

What to Do When Your Dog is Vomiting Frequently?

If you suspect any illness, you should call your vet immediately. If your pooch has eaten any dead or spoiled animal by any chance, your vet will prescribe the necessary antibiotics. In some extreme cases, your pooch might need to be provided with an IV drip overnight to avoid any dehydration.

In mind vomiting cases, Pepto Bismol or Tylenol may be recommended by your vet. But it is important that you must NEVER give these to your furry friend, unless your vet consents for it first.
Any food should be kept away from your dog if he vomits frequently all through the day. Provide your dog with ice chips to make up for his hydration but don’t give him any fluids if your dog keeps vomiting or has diarrhea. After you’ve not given him water for 12 hours, begin introducing bland meals to him. This includes rice, boiled hamburger, or plain oatmeal. If your pooch stops vomiting in the next few days, you can re-introduce his normal dog food.

Brenda Lyttle is a dog lover and enjoys making Halloween costumes for dogs in her free time.

September 20, 2018 |

6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

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6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

Springtime is here and it’s time to get out in the yard. When planting, remember some plants are toxic to dogs and other pets. Here’s a list of items to stay away from:

  • Oleander – It can cause serious issues including gastrointestinal tract irritation and abnormal heart function.
  • Lilies – They are toxic to cats and can cause severe kidney damage.
  • Tulips – The bulbs contain toxins that cause drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions and heart abnormalities.
  • Cocoa mulch – Reacts like chocolate to dogs causing vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors, hyperactivity and seizures.
  • Aloe – Can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia and tremors
  • Azalea – May cause vomiting, diarrhea, weekness, and other issues.

Stay safe this spring and for more information about toxins in plants, visit the ASPCA.

 

 

March 4, 2018 |

5 common Valentine’s Day toxins for pets

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Valentine's day

Valentine's day

Valentine’s day is this week and with all the human festivities, there are hidden dangers for your pets. Below are toxic items that you may give or receive on Valentine’s day to hide from your best friend.

  1. Chocolate – Ingestions of more than 0.1 ounces per pound of body weight of dark or semi-sweet chocolate may cause poisoning.
  2. Roses – Although not really poisonous, the thorns can tear through a puppies throat and stomach.
  3. Lillies – Sometimes given instead of roses, lillies contain a toxin that is deadly to pets
  4. Macadamia nuts – Poisonous to dogs but no cats.
  5. Xylitol – The sugar substitute can cause drop in blood sugar as well as liver damage in dogs.

Stay safe this Valentine’s day!

January 19, 2018 |

New Year’s Eve Safety Tips for Your Dog

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New Year’s Eve Safety Tips for Your Dog

Christmas is behind us, the world didn’t end, now it’s time to party like it’s 1999… or 2016. Whether your partying out in New York City watching the ball drop, at a club, throwing a party or just sitting on the couch watching the ball drop, we hope you have a safe an happy New Year. Follow these tips to make sure your best friend has a safe and happy New Year also.

  • Don’t leave your pet outside on New Year’s Eve. Fireworks and other loud noises will be happening. Don’t let them get scared and take a chance of them jumping the fence, digging out or hurting themselves.
  • Make sure they are wearing their bling! Keep the collars on and make sure their tags are up-to-date and readable in case the Fido runs and does get away. If you have people over, you never know who may accidentally let them out.
  • Just because you like to drink does not mean your dog should! Alcohol is bad for dogs, their bodies aren’t made to break it down. Keep the New Year’s Eve cocktails away. Besides, we know you don’t like sharing them.
  • Keep a safe space available. If your dog like’s their crate, make sure it is accessible. Everyone should always have a safe place.
  • Leave a noise on. If you’re going out, leave a radio or TV on as a distraction. Who knows, your dog may learn some new tricks watching it while you are gone.
  • Watch the decorations. Christmas decorations may still be up or who know… you may already have the Groundhog Day decorations out, they come out so early these days. Make sure none of your guests knock them over into your pet’s reach.

Remember to have a Happy New Year and be safe!

December 26, 2017 |
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