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Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

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Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

It’s the official kick-off to the holiday season, first one up, Thanksgiving. Mmmm the turkey, ham, stuffing and desserts… is your mouth watering yet? While we’re over indulging on delicious foods with our extended family and friends, remember these tips so that your best friend(s) have a day to be thankful for also.

  • A Tired Dog is a Happy Dog: Before the house starts filling up with friends and family, go for a walk. Get your pups ya-ya’s out now. Besides, it will help you make more room for the great food your going to over indulge in!
  • Collar and Tags: As with any gathering, ensure that your pup has their bling on. Collar is on correctly and tags are up-to-date. You don’t want to spend the afternoon searching for a lost dog.
  • Turkey and Trimmings: I know, we all want to share a little and every once in a while that’s OK. Ensure that the turkey is fully cooked so that there is no salmonella bacteria and please, please make sure there are no bones. Turkey bones are small and can easily choke or hurt their stomach. Try putting some in a Kong or Busy Buddy and make the moment last, you’re pup will enjoy the food and the challenge.
  • Onions, Grapes, Raisins and Chocolate, Oh My!: Just because they are all ingredients that make the day and meal doesn’t mean they should be shared. All of the items listed are toxic to dogs and other pets and should not be shared.
  • Keep a Lid On It: The meal smells so good while cooking, it also smells so good to your best buddy in the trash. Keep a lid on it and avoid messes and embarrassing moments.
  • No Yappy Hours: While the Thanksgiving cocktails may be flowing two things you should always adhere to. 1. Don’t drink and drive and 2. Never leave your cocktails on the ground or in reach of your dogs or other pets, they are toxic.

Most of all, have fun, be thankful and enjoy time with your family and friends! Happy Thanksgiving from all of us here at DogGeek.com

November 11, 2018 |

5 Halloween Safety Tips for Dogs

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Dog Halloween Safety Tips

Dog Halloween Safety Tips

Many years before dog-shaming.com took off people have shaming their dogs in Halloween costumes. I know… I know… but your dog likes it. Let’s face it, no one wants to be forcefully dressed up in clothes they didn’t pick out. Now, we’re not judging because we’ve put the fair share of costumes our dogs and still do. We’re just calling it what it is… CUTE! All fun put aside, please remember these safety tips so your pooch ghost is safe this Halloween!

  1. No matter how many tricks they do, no treats from the candy bowl! Chocolate, artificail sweetners and other candies are toxic to our best friends. if you do suspect that your dog has ingested something toxic, call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.
  2. Pumpkins may look great on the front porch, but open flames should never be around a pet. Try using flame shaped LED lights, you can easily find them at Target or other stores.
  3. Back to the costumes, if you’re going to do it make sure that your dog can walk, move and most importantly breathe in their costume.
  4. Don’t let them greet for the treats. During the time where trick-or-treaters are coming to the door, keep your dog in another room so that they can not dart out the door if they get scared. Most lost pets are lost during the holidays because of the distractions.
  5. Put an ID tag on them! In case they escape you want them to be able to come home. ID’s Only about 15% of dogs lost are reunited with their families. ID and microchipping is the best way to ensure that your best friend finds their way home.

And remember, have a great time!

 

 

September 26, 2018 |

3 Tips to Keep Your Pooch Safe in The Car

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Dog Care Safety

Dog Care SafetyIf you want to get your dog all excited and wagging its tail, just jingle your car keys and ask “Do you wanna go for a ride?!” It (almost) never fails.

Like many pooches, your pup adores riding in the car with you. Whether you’re heading out on a road trip or merely running some errands in town, you also love having your four-legged bestie along for the adventure.

Check out the following tips to keep your best pal as safe as possible on the open road.

1. Invest in a Doggy Restraint System

Much like you prioritize wearing a seatbelt — hopefully for your kids, too — you also want to make sure Fido is safely restrained before putting your car in reverse. Indeed, don’t let your dog go unharnessed and suffer an injury.

According to PetMD, when you get in an accident with an unrestrained dog, they can incur broken bones, punctured lungs and other serious injuries. To prevent this altogether, purchase a restraint of some kind to keep your dog safe and secure. You can find canine seatbelts at any local or online pet store.

For example, the website for Doctors Foster and Smith carries vehicle safety harnesses in a number of sizes for about $25 each. So if you’re heading out on a long trip with your dog, you might want to test drive the harness first, allowing you to practice safely strapping your dog in as they get used to the idea of wearing it.

2. Keep Your Car in Tip-Top Shape

Getting a flat tire on your way to Starbucks with your pup for a latte and “puppaccino” is stressful enough; having car trouble in the middle of nowhere is even worse. To prevent this from happening, follow your car’s regular maintenance schedule by getting regular oil changes and tune-ups. Also, keep a close eye on your tires to ensure they’re in good, working condition.

To evaluate your tires for baldness, use a penny or a quarter to determine each tire’s remaining tread depth. Simply insert a penny into the tire treads on all four tires, with Honest Abe’s head facing down. If you can see the top of Lincoln’s head, your tires are at 2/32nds of an inch or less of tread and should be replaced immediately.

3. Don’t Let Fido Stick His Head Out the Window

We’ve all seen it: Carefree, happy-looking dogs sticking their heads out of the car window. Despite the joys it may bring Fido, it’s definitely not a safe activity. Of course, road debris and any number of other things can fly up and hit your dog in the face, and if they spot a small animal (squirrel!), they may very well try to jump out, leading to serious injuries or death.

Have Fun, and be Sure to Send a Postcard

Despite these and other safety warnings, it’s definitely fine to bring your pooch with you on driving trips. But by incorporating these tips into your routine, your time together running errands and going on vacation will not only be fun, but it will also be safe for your beautiful dog.

June 25, 2018 |

Keeping Your Dog Calm During Fireworks

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fireworks

fireworks

Fireworks can wreak havoc on a dog’s nerves and you can not control which neighbors will let them off when. Here are some tips to help when fireworks are being set off:

  1. Stay calm and gentle. Don’t mirror your dog’s anxiety.
    This is your time to shine as the alpha leader of your family. Be empathetic but confident, so your dog knows that he is protected and doesn’t have to play that role for you. Don’t coddle!
  2. Don’t punish your dog or command that they “relax.”
    Your dog’s surprise by all the noises would be the same if your house came under air raid. Imagine how you would feel with someone sternly telling you to lay down and relax.
  3. Try distracting your dog.
    This is a great time to bring out special toys (like the ones that squeak in ways that might drive you to drink). Or, special occasion treats. If you have a combination, even better! There are many toys that feature areas to stuff them with a treat where the treat removal becomes a puzzle for your dog. But, if your dog doesn’t want to play or eat treats, don’t force the issue.
  4. Let your dog be in the place that he feels safest.
    This might mean your lap, which could be comfortable if your dog is a pug, not so comfortable if it’s a German Shepherd. If your dog wants to be on the floor at your feet, let him. Don’t command that he be on the couch with you, where it’s more comfortable for you to pet and soothe him. Try getting on the floor with him to see if that helps.
  5. Stay in an enclosed room with your dog.
    Basements and man caves are typically already designed to drown out the noises of everyday life. These are great places to retreat with your dog and put on some music or a movie to help cover the erratic sounds of fireworks.

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June 24, 2018 |
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