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Top 5 Pet Safety Tips for the Holidays to Ensure Your Dog has a Safe and Merry Christmas

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Top 5 Pet Safety Tips for the Holidays to Ensure Your Dog has a Safe and Merry Christmas

The Holidays bring excitement, parties, meals and decorations all of which can be a hazard to your pet. No need to cancel the festivities, just be prepared so that you and your best friend have a safe and merry Christmas! Here’s a top 5 list to of things to remember to make sure your holiday is safe for your pets:

Top 5 Pet Safety Tips for the Holidays to Ensure Your Dog has a Safe and Merry Christmas1. Keep all holiday food on high ground out of your pet’s reach. Just like how people pack on the pounds during the holidays because of irresistible food, dogs want to eat too. Remember, chocolate, alcohol and other feeds can be toxic to your pet.

2. Secure and/or hide all lighting and other electric cords.Whether its the desire to see what the cord tastes like and having a shocking experience or the rough play running around the house and tripping making the tree fall down, cords can get in the way and wreak havoc if not properly secure. Make sure they are tucked up against the wall securely so they won’t be played with. If needed, spray down with Bitter Apple or another taste aversion spray.

3. Carefully choose holiday plants and where you put them. Many of them are dangerous to your pets. Mistletoe, holly, lilies and poinsettias call all be poisonous and affect them in different ways. Make sure they are out of reach as to not be eaten and secure so they won’t be tipped over.

4. Keep their safe spot safe. Many dogs have a safe spot. Whether it be in their crate in a certain spot or their bed in the living room, don’t make their safe spot the new place for the tree or other holiday items. Pets thrive on routine, let them know that even with all the fun, this is still their home too and they have a safe spot.

5. Ensure ID tags are on and readable.With people coming and going during all the parties your dog or other pets may get out. Make sure they get home safe with proper ID tags, microchips if you can.

Have a safe and Merry Christmas from our family at DogGeek.com to yours.

December 10, 2020 |

Dangerous Holiday Food for Dogs

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Dangerous Holiday Food for Dogs

Dangerous Holiday Food for Dogs

The holidays are full of friends, family, parties and food and we all want our fur family to be involved. The one thing that no one wants during the season is an emergency pet bill though. The following food can make your dog ill or even poison them so avoid them and reach for the treat bag instead if you just can’t hold back sharing with them.

  • Alcohol
  • Chocolate/cocoa
  • Grapes
  • Raisins
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Persimmons
  • Milk/Dairy products
  • Bones
  • Onions (Chives)
  • Nuts
  • Raw meats
  • Raw poultry
  • Raw fish
  • Yeast dough
  • Eggs
  • Candy
  • Gum
  • Coffe grounds
  • Rhubarb
  • Candies or baked goods using Xylitol

It’s not just the food, remember to have your lights, cords,tree and other decorations out of reach from your pups.

Last but not least, remember to have a good time and ejoy the season!

December 1, 2020 |

Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

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Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

It’s the official kick-off to the holiday season, first one up, Thanksgiving. Mmmm the turkey, ham, stuffing and desserts… is your mouth watering yet? While we’re over indulging on delicious foods with our extended family and friends, remember these tips so that your best friend(s) have a day to be thankful for also.

  • A Tired Dog is a Happy Dog: Before the house starts filling up with friends and family, go for a walk. Get your pups ya-ya’s out now. Besides, it will help you make more room for the great food your going to over indulge in!
  • Collar and Tags: As with any gathering, ensure that your pup has their bling on. Collar is on correctly and tags are up-to-date. You don’t want to spend the afternoon searching for a lost dog.
  • Turkey and Trimmings: I know, we all want to share a little and every once in a while that’s OK. Ensure that the turkey is fully cooked so that there is no salmonella bacteria and please, please make sure there are no bones. Turkey bones are small and can easily choke or hurt their stomach. Try putting some in a Kong or Busy Buddy and make the moment last, you’re pup will enjoy the food and the challenge.
  • Onions, Grapes, Raisins and Chocolate, Oh My!: Just because they are all ingredients that make the day and meal doesn’t mean they should be shared. All of the items listed are toxic to dogs and other pets and should not be shared.
  • Keep a Lid On It: The meal smells so good while cooking, it also smells so good to your best buddy in the trash. Keep a lid on it and avoid messes and embarrassing moments.
  • No Yappy Hours: While the Thanksgiving cocktails may be flowing two things you should always adhere to. 1. Don’t drink and drive and 2. Never leave your cocktails on the ground or in reach of your dogs or other pets, they are toxic.

Most of all, have fun, be thankful and enjoy time with your family and friends! Happy Thanksgiving from all of us here at DogGeek.com

November 1, 2020 |

Thanksgiving foods that will make your dog sick

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Thanksgiving foods that will make your dog sick

It's officially Thanksgiving when #Nico puts on his "I turkey turkey" shirt!

If you’re like most pet families your best friend is right there besid you while you’re cooking. Whether it’s just a Monday night frozen meal or a Thanksgiving feast Fido doesn’t care, he wants a piece of the action, or turkey. Ensure that your best friend has a great Thanksgiving and doesn’t need a trip to the emergency vet. Here are 5 foods they need to avoid.

  1. Turkey Bones. While everyone’s been told that dogs love to chew on bones, turkey bones are not the ones to give them. Turkey bones are small and can become lodged in your dog’s stomach or throat. They also splinter causing severe damage to the stomach.
  2. Fat Trimmings. Fatty foods like turkey skin and gravy are very difficult for dogs to digest. They can also cause pancreatitis which includes vomiting, depression, reluctance to move and abdominal pain as symptoms.
  3. Dough and Batter. The dough can rise in your dog’s stomach and lead to vomiting, bloating and severe pain. The raw eggs can also spread salmonella.
  4. Grapes and Raisins. Both can cause kidney failure in dogs.
  5. Mushrooms. They can damage kedneys, liver and the central nervous system.

Be safe and have a happy Thanksgiving!

November 1, 2020 |

Summertime Dangers for Dogs: Heat Stroke & Drowning

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Summertime Dangers for Dogs

Summertime Dangers for Dogs

Just because Labor Day is right around the corner, don’t stop being vigilant when it comes to keeping your dogs safe in the summer months. Here’s how to recognize and neutralize two potential dangers that your pet could face in summer:

Prevent Deadly Heat Stroke

Summer sun and temps won’t go away just because the calendar says September, especially in California and parts of the South and Southwest. With the glow of the sun comes high temperatures, and that intense heat can pose a danger to your pets, who can easily become overheated. Overheating could lead to heat stroke, which could be deadly to your pet. Here are some tips from the Central Oregon Veterinary Group on how to prevent heat stroke in dogs:

  1. Your dog can’t fill his own water bowl. Make sure he or she has an adequate supply.
  2. Never chain your pet in a spot where shade is not (or will not be) available.
  3. Never leave your pet inside the car while you leave for “just a minute.”
  4. Take your pet for walks during the cooler parts of the day.
  5. Head for the river! A dip in the stream will feel good for both of you.

Signs of heatstroke include excessive panting, pale gums, thick drool, and vomiting. Heat stroke is a serious condition and needs immediate attention, so if your dog is showing signs of any of these symptoms, call your veterinarian right away. In the meantime, provide your dog with cool (not cold!) drinking water and use a cool damp towel over his or her fur and belly to help draw out some of the body heat.

Prevent Swimming Pool Drownings

Among Americans’ favorite summertime activities is floating down a local river on inner tubes and rafts. Swimming, of course, is popular too. Many locals also retreat to their own backyard swimming pools, which is a convenience and a great source of entertainment, but also poses a potential hazard for dogs. If your dog jumps or falls into a pool of water, it may be difficult for him or her to get back out. Most dogs can tread water for a few hours, but once exhaustion sets in, they could drown. Dogs can be trained to get out of a pool on their own, but don’t count on yours knowing how to instinctively.

Ask your pool installer or vet about safety measures to prevent pet drownings. Visit PoolProducts.com and review the variety of safety products available. There are “skamper ramps” and dog safety life jackets available for purchase. Make your pool pet-friendly and rest with the peace of mind that your backyard is safe for your family and pets.

Be Wise, Have Fun and Keep Your Pet Safe

Don’t let concerns about heat stroke and drowning prevent you from having fun in the sun with your pets and loved ones. By taking simple preventative measures and keeping a close watch on the health and location of your pet, there are only good times ahead.

July 19, 2020 |
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