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Summer Pet Safety Tips

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summer dog

summer dogWarm weather is here and it’s time to start thinking about your pet’s safety. Here’s a list of some safety tips to keep your best friend(s) happy and enjoying the summer fun:

  • Never leave animals alone in the car. Even when it’s only 70 degrees outside, your car can reach 90 degrees on the inside within 10 minutes greatly increasing the risk of heat stroke.
  • Repeat… Never leave animals alone in the car. Even if you leave it running! Your dog could accidentally put the car in gear or cause other damage.
  • Think about your dog’s feet when walking. A 77 degree day means that the asphalt on the street is 125 degrees if it’s sunny outside. We know you don’t want to walk barefoot on that, neither do they! Try taking a walk in the early morning before it heats up.
  • Make sure there is pleanty of water. Dogs cannot cool themselves by sweating like we do. Panting is the only option they have. Make sure there is access to cool, clean water to drink.
  • Fleas, ticks and mosquitoes abound when it’s warm out. Make sure your pet is protected as to not get heart worms, lyme disease or others.
  • Read the label on that yard treatment. Although everyone wants a nice green yard with no weeds, the treatment you put down may poison your pet. Read the label to ensure it is safe.
  • Ensure tags are up-to-date and readable. Summertime is when everyone is outside and the chances for a dog to get out increase. To help them get back to you quickly, make sure tags are up to date with your mobile number.
  • Plan ahead for vacations. If Fido is going with you, make sure to book dog friendly hotels in advance so they are not full. If they are not going, make sure a dog sitter or kennel is booked. No one wants to cancel a vacation at the last minute because Fido doesn’t have a place to go.
  • Get rid of the winter coats. You put your’s away, so should they. Shedding is natural and helps remove some of the winter fur, but your best friend could use some help. Shaving is never a good option since it opens their skin up to burning but a good dog grooming will help rmove the excess fur.
July 5, 2022 |

Summertime Dangers for Dogs: Heat Stroke & Drowning

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Summertime Dangers for Dogs

Summertime Dangers for Dogs

Just because Labor Day is right around the corner, don’t stop being vigilant when it comes to keeping your dogs safe in the summer months. Here’s how to recognize and neutralize two potential dangers that your pet could face in summer:

Prevent Deadly Heat Stroke

Summer sun and temps won’t go away just because the calendar says September, especially in California and parts of the South and Southwest. With the glow of the sun comes high temperatures, and that intense heat can pose a danger to your pets, who can easily become overheated. Overheating could lead to heat stroke, which could be deadly to your pet. Here are some tips from the Central Oregon Veterinary Group on how to prevent heat stroke in dogs:

  1. Your dog can’t fill his own water bowl. Make sure he or she has an adequate supply.
  2. Never chain your pet in a spot where shade is not (or will not be) available.
  3. Never leave your pet inside the car while you leave for “just a minute.”
  4. Take your pet for walks during the cooler parts of the day.
  5. Head for the river! A dip in the stream will feel good for both of you.

Signs of heatstroke include excessive panting, pale gums, thick drool, and vomiting. Heat stroke is a serious condition and needs immediate attention, so if your dog is showing signs of any of these symptoms, call your veterinarian right away. In the meantime, provide your dog with cool (not cold!) drinking water and use a cool damp towel over his or her fur and belly to help draw out some of the body heat.

Prevent Swimming Pool Drownings

Among Americans’ favorite summertime activities is floating down a local river on inner tubes and rafts. Swimming, of course, is popular too. Many locals also retreat to their own backyard swimming pools, which is a convenience and a great source of entertainment, but also poses a potential hazard for dogs. If your dog jumps or falls into a pool of water, it may be difficult for him or her to get back out. Most dogs can tread water for a few hours, but once exhaustion sets in, they could drown. Dogs can be trained to get out of a pool on their own, but don’t count on yours knowing how to instinctively.

Ask your pool installer or vet about safety measures to prevent pet drownings. Visit PoolProducts.com and review the variety of safety products available. There are “skamper ramps” and dog safety life jackets available for purchase. Make your pool pet-friendly and rest with the peace of mind that your backyard is safe for your family and pets.

Be Wise, Have Fun and Keep Your Pet Safe

Don’t let concerns about heat stroke and drowning prevent you from having fun in the sun with your pets and loved ones. By taking simple preventative measures and keeping a close watch on the health and location of your pet, there are only good times ahead.

June 8, 2022 |

Summer Safety For Dogs

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summer abba

summer abbaSummertime is here and that means lots of activities for you and your best friend but it also means chances for danger. While out and about with your dog this summer, remember these pet safety rules.

  • Never leave your dog in a car alone, even if the windows are down. 
    Even on a nice 80 degree day, your car can heat up over 100 degrees or more in 10 minutes. Dogs have heat strokes at 110 degrees. Cracking the window still does not allow enough ventilation for all the heat to escape and opening it too much will allow your dog the ability to jump out. If you can’t take your dog with you every where that you go, leave him at home. Trust us, he will appreciate it more.
  • Never put your dog in the back of a pickup truck without being in a crate properly restrained.
    Yes, we know he may “like” it, but it’s not safe. Dogs are easily distracted by many things, squirrels being one of the most popular items. You do no want your dog jumping out of the back of a moving vehicle. And do not use just a leash to keep them from jumping as your dog could hang themselves by accident. If your dog has to ride in the back, please crate them with the proper restraints and protection from the wind. Just like how you like being protected by the windshield, so do they.
  • Asphalt heats up quickly, protect your dog’s paws
    Black asphalt, as with any black items, heats up quickly in the sun light. Don’t walk your dog during the heat of the day and if you do, check the temperature of the asphalt. If it burns your hands it can burn the pads on their feet.
  • Ensure your dog has plenty of shade while outside
    If you must leave your dog outside for any amount of time, ensure that they have plenty of shade as to not get sunburned or over heated.
  • Keep their water fresh and full
    During the summer
    water evaporates fast and is a place where parasites can grow. Remember to replace their water daily and to keep it full so that your dog does not dehydrate.
  • Go to the groomer
    Imagine if you had to have a fur coat on all summer. While a dog’s hair does have built in heat management, they need help. Take yours to a dog groomer to get their undercoat brushed out so that the air can flow thru easily cooling your dog. Never shave down to the skin as their skin can burn just like yours.
  • Keep them on a leash
    We know, it’s summer and everyone wants to run free, but unless it’s an off leash dog park or your fenced back yard, always keep your best friend on a leash. It will help keep them from getting lost, getting into a fight with other dogs or being hit by a car.
  • Keep the cocktails and food on high ground
    Everyone loves a cookout, so does your dog.
    Remember that your dog doesn’t know which foods and drinks are good for them, they only know what smells good to them. Cocktails and beer can lead to alcohol poisoning fast.

Have fun this summer and be safe!

Find a dog park near you >>

May 26, 2022 |

Keep Your Dog Safe On Easter – Easter Pet Safety Tips

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Bowie Easter Bunny

Bowie Easter Bunny

The trees and flowers are blooming and your allergies are taking over. This could mean only one thing, it’s spring! While spring is a great time to get out in the yard and celebrate with your family, there are some potential hazards for your dog. Easter brings celebration but it also brings a lot of toxic dangers around for your dogs. Here’s a list to watch out for:

  • Easter Grass – That colorful fake grass used to make your Easter basket so vibrant. Ingesting this “grass” can be lethal to your dogs and other pets because they can not digest it. The threads get stuck in their intestines causing damage.
  • Plastic Eggs – Those shiny plastic eggs that contain goodies and sometimes, if you’re a really lucky kid, money. If chewed and swallowed the plastic can cause intestinal problems that may require surgery. Make sure you keep track of how many you put out and that they are all found by who should find them, not Fido days later.
  • Chocolate – We all know that chocolate is dangerous to pets, but make sure your children know. Besides, puppies love bunnies, they just shouldn’t have chocolate ones.
  • Easter Lillies – They are a sign that spring is a coming, brining new life out of winter. But, did you know that they are one of the most poisinous plants for pets? Especially cats. They can cause kidney failure in less than two days if untreated.
  • Toys – Don’t forget those small and fun toy bunnies, chicks and others Easter basket stuffers that post a potential choking hazard for Fido.

Find more information about pet toxins and poisonous items for dogs and cats at the Pet Poison Helpline at www.petpoisonhelponline.com. The helpline is also open 24/7 at (800) 213-6680.

Have a happy and great Easter with your family!

March 21, 2022 |

6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

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6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

6 Springtime Items That Are Toxic to Dogs

Springtime is here and it’s time to get out in the yard. When planting, remember some plants are toxic to dogs and other pets. Here’s a list of items to stay away from:

  • Oleander – It can cause serious issues including gastrointestinal tract irritation and abnormal heart function.
  • Lilies – They are toxic to cats and can cause severe kidney damage.
  • Tulips – The bulbs contain toxins that cause drooling, loss of appetite, depression of the central nervous system, convulsions and heart abnormalities.
  • Cocoa mulch – Reacts like chocolate to dogs causing vomiting, diarrhea, muscle tremors, hyperactivity and seizures.
  • Aloe – Can cause vomiting, depression, diarrhea, anorexia and tremors
  • Azalea – May cause vomiting, diarrhea, weekness, and other issues.

Stay safe this spring and for more information about toxins in plants, visit the ASPCA.

 

 

March 21, 2022 |

Simple at-home grooming tips to keep your dog healthy

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grooming tips

grooming tips

A DogGeek.com exclusive by Teresa Barker

In order to be healthy, whether human or canine, one must do regular grooming. Dogs, not unlike teenagers, may need a little gentle coaxing, but will benefit greatly from simple at-home regular grooming. The more often you groom, the more conditioned they get to the treatment (literally and figuratively!), so start early and lather, rinse and repeat often.

  1. Brush your dog’s fur.
    This seems like a simple step, but it’s important. Many dogs simply love the attention that regular gentle brushing gives them. Dogs with undercoats benefit greatly by regular brushing, especially in the spring and summer when they are shedding their winter fur. Brushing a dog is not unlike brushing your own head, in that it helps spread natural oils and loosens up dirt or debris. This is also a great time to check for fleas/ticks and to see if your dog has any tender areas that may need to be checked out by a vet.
  2. Bathe them regularly.
    Scrub-a-dub-dub and get the dog in the tub! Dogs roll in the grass and dirt, play in the bushes, dig in the mud and lay on the ground. All that dirty play has an effect on your dog’s coat. Fur is like a sponge and regular bathing can keep dirt from building up, which might lead to irritated skin and excessive scratching. Make sure the water is lukewarm and always use a gentle hypo-allergenic natural dog wash. Dogs have varying levels of enthusiasm for bath time, so you might want to do tip #3 (trim your dog’s nails) before hopping into the tub.
  3. Trim your dog’s nails.
    Long nails on dogs can cause them unnecessary pain. A good pair of nail trimmers with a safety guard can help you feel confident that you won’t accidentally cut into their quick (a vein that runs partially into the nail) and regular leg massages will keep them relaxed when you handle their feet. If you’ve never trimmed a dog’s nails, have your vet show you the safe and easy way, because your gentle confidence will make the experience smooth and fast for your dog as well.
  4. Brush your dog’s teeth.
    Yuck mouth doesn’t just stink, it’s unhealthy! You can use a gentle children’s toothbrush or a special brush designed for a dog. Brushing at least 2 times a week will keep periodontal disease at bay, which in turn will keep your dog around longer. Just don’t try to achieve that Colgate smile and avoid using human toothpaste. There are many affordable dog dental products on the market that are safe to swallow, and taste good too!
  5. Clean your dog’s ears.
    Ears are a fantastic environment for bacteria to breed. They are cavernous, dark and often moist. It’s important to check your dog’s ears regularly to see that they are dry and clean and not irritated. After bathing or swimming, gently but thoroughly dry the inside of your dog’s ears to make sure no moisture is left. Diluted apple cider vinegar applied to a cotton ball is an easy weekly maintenance cleaning and works as a natural antiseptic. Dogs with big floppy ears are especially prone to ear mites and bacteria growth, so be sure to check them out frequently.

Grooming your dog at home is a great way to bond with your pooch. They love the personal attention and adding one or two things a week will take you no time at all. A clean dog is a healthy dog and is much more likely to get hugs and kisses than a stinky dog. If all else fails, there are plenty of professionals who groom dogs for a living.

January 2, 2022 |
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