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Signs of Hypothermia in Dogs

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Signs of Hypothermia in Dogs

Signs of Hypothermia in Dogs

All pets can get hypothermia in cold weather but short haired, young/old, skinny and diabetic dogs are more susceptible. Look for the following signs if you think your dog might be suffering.

  • Sluggishness
  • Shallow, slow breathing
  • Unresponsiveness
  • Excessive whining & shivering
  • Anxiousness
  • Dilated blood vessels
  • Low body temperature
  • Drop in pulse
  • Drop in blood pressure
  • Unconsciousness
  • Death occurs eventually

If your dog shows any of these signs get them to the veterinarian right away.

January 15, 2019 |

How To Clean Your Dog’s Ears

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dog ear cleaning

A DogGeek.com exclusive by Teresa Barker

dog ear cleaningKeeping your dog’s ears free from moisture and bacteria is an important step in your regular grooming schedule. During hot summer months, and swimming season, you might be checking and cleaning your dog’s ears weekly or even daily. Think of your dog’s ears as a hot and moist petri dish for bacteria to flourish and grow. Think that’s gross? Try taking a whiff of the waxy brown stuff that you clean out. Yuck!

Here’s a few tips to keeping your dog’s ears clean.

  1. Check Them Daily
    This is the most important aspect of keeping your dog’s ears clean and healthy. It doesn’t take long (a few days) for a little moisture to grow into a full blown problem. Your dog might scratch at his ears, causing infection and another problem to add to the list.
  2. Keep Them Dry
    Moisture is usually the culprit. Simply swabbing inside of your dog’s ears with a cotton ball daily can help absorb anything moisture that crept in. It will also indicate if there is a need to clean deeper.
  3. Trim Hair Growing into the Ear.
    Especially important for harrier breeds, poodles and terriers. Hair can trap moisture and result in helping the petri dish environment flourish.
  4. Use a Soft Cloth Wrapped Over Your Index Finger as a Swabber
    Gently wipe inside of your dog’s ears. Diluted tea tree oil applied to the cloth is a wonderful antibacterial that will help prevent future build up.

Shaking of the head and scratching of the ears is NOT normal for dogs. If you see your dog exhibiting this kind of behavior, inspect thoroughly, as ear infections are extremely uncomfortable and can eventually lead to deafness. Also, remember, the more often you clean and check your dog’s ears, the less gross the job is!

January 2, 2019 |

Simple at-home grooming tips to keep your dog healthy

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grooming tips

grooming tips

A DogGeek.com exclusive by Teresa Barker

In order to be healthy, whether human or canine, one must do regular grooming. Dogs, not unlike teenagers, may need a little gentle coaxing, but will benefit greatly from simple at-home regular grooming. The more often you groom, the more conditioned they get to the treatment (literally and figuratively!), so start early and lather, rinse and repeat often.

  1. Brush your dog’s fur.
    This seems like a simple step, but it’s important. Many dogs simply love the attention that regular gentle brushing gives them. Dogs with undercoats benefit greatly by regular brushing, especially in the spring and summer when they are shedding their winter fur. Brushing a dog is not unlike brushing your own head, in that it helps spread natural oils and loosens up dirt or debris. This is also a great time to check for fleas/ticks and to see if your dog has any tender areas that may need to be checked out by a vet.
  2. Bathe them regularly.
    Scrub-a-dub-dub and get the dog in the tub! Dogs roll in the grass and dirt, play in the bushes, dig in the mud and lay on the ground. All that dirty play has an effect on your dog’s coat. Fur is like a sponge and regular bathing can keep dirt from building up, which might lead to irritated skin and excessive scratching. Make sure the water is lukewarm and always use a gentle hypo-allergenic natural dog wash. Dogs have varying levels of enthusiasm for bath time, so you might want to do tip #3 (trim your dog’s nails) before hopping into the tub.
  3. Trim your dog’s nails.
    Long nails on dogs can cause them unnecessary pain. A good pair of nail trimmers with a safety guard can help you feel confident that you won’t accidentally cut into their quick (a vein that runs partially into the nail) and regular leg massages will keep them relaxed when you handle their feet. If you’ve never trimmed a dog’s nails, have your vet show you the safe and easy way, because your gentle confidence will make the experience smooth and fast for your dog as well.
  4. Brush your dog’s teeth.
    Yuck mouth doesn’t just stink, it’s unhealthy! You can use a gentle children’s toothbrush or a special brush designed for a dog. Brushing at least 2 times a week will keep periodontal disease at bay, which in turn will keep your dog around longer. Just don’t try to achieve that Colgate smile and avoid using human toothpaste. There are many affordable dog dental products on the market that are safe to swallow, and taste good too!
  5. Clean your dog’s ears.
    Ears are a fantastic environment for bacteria to breed. They are cavernous, dark and often moist. It’s important to check your dog’s ears regularly to see that they are dry and clean and not irritated. After bathing or swimming, gently but thoroughly dry the inside of your dog’s ears to make sure no moisture is left. Diluted apple cider vinegar applied to a cotton ball is an easy weekly maintenance cleaning and works as a natural antiseptic. Dogs with big floppy ears are especially prone to ear mites and bacteria growth, so be sure to check them out frequently.

Grooming your dog at home is a great way to bond with your pooch. They love the personal attention and adding one or two things a week will take you no time at all. A clean dog is a healthy dog and is much more likely to get hugs and kisses than a stinky dog. If all else fails, there are plenty of professionals who groom dogs for a living and you can find one at: https://www.doggeek.com/dog-groomers/ where you can make regular spa appointments if you need a little help. Remember, cleanliness is next to Dogliness!

Find a dog groomer near you >>

January 2, 2019 |

Top 5 Pet Safety Tips for the Holidays to Ensure Your Dog has a Safe and Merry Christmas

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Top 5 Pet Safety Tips for the Holidays to Ensure Your Dog has a Safe and Merry Christmas

The Holidays bring excitement, parties, meals and decorations all of which can be a hazard to your pet. No need to cancel the festivities, just be prepared so that you and your best friend have a safe and merry Christmas! Here’s a top 5 list to of things to remember to make sure your holiday is safe for your pets:

Top 5 Pet Safety Tips for the Holidays to Ensure Your Dog has a Safe and Merry Christmas1. Keep all holiday food on high ground out of your pet’s reach. Just like how people pack on the pounds during the holidays because of irresistible food, dogs want to eat too. Remember, chocolate, alcohol and other feeds can be toxic to your pet.

2. Secure and/or hide all lighting and other electric cords.Whether its the desire to see what the cord tastes like and having a shocking experience or the rough play running around the house and tripping making the tree fall down, cords can get in the way and wreak havoc if not properly secure. Make sure they are tucked up against the wall securely so they won’t be played with. If needed, spray down with Bitter Apple or another taste aversion spray.

3. Carefully choose holiday plants and where you put them. Many of them are dangerous to your pets. Mistletoe, holly, lilies and poinsettias call all be poisonous and affect them in different ways. Make sure they are out of reach as to not be eaten and secure so they won’t be tipped over.

4. Keep their safe spot safe. Many dogs have a safe spot. Whether it be in their crate in a certain spot or their bed in the living room, don’t make their safe spot the new place for the tree or other holiday items. Pets thrive on routine, let them know that even with all the fun, this is still their home too and they have a safe spot.

5. Ensure ID tags are on and readable.With people coming and going during all the parties your dog or other pets may get out. Make sure they get home safe with proper ID tags, microchips if you can.

Have a safe and Merry Christmas from our family at DogGeek.com to yours.

December 19, 2018 |

Dangerous Holiday Food for Dogs

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Dangerous Holiday Food for Dogs

Dangerous Holiday Food for Dogs

The holidays are full of friends, family, parties and food and we all want our fur family to be involved. The one thing that no one wants during the season is an emergency pet bill though. The following food can make your dog ill or even poison them so avoid them and reach for the treat bag instead if you just can’t hold back sharing with them.

  • Alcohol
  • Chocolate/cocoa
  • Grapes
  • Raisins
  • Peaches
  • Plums
  • Persimmons
  • Milk/Dairy products
  • Bones
  • Onions (Chives)
  • Nuts
  • Raw meats
  • Raw poultry
  • Raw fish
  • Yeast dough
  • Eggs
  • Candy
  • Gum
  • Coffe grounds
  • Rhubarb
  • Candies or baked goods using Xylitol

It’s not just the food, remember to have your lights, cords,tree and other decorations out of reach from your pups.

Last but not least, remember to have a good time and ejoy the season!

December 8, 2018 |

Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

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Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

Thanksgiving Day Dog Safety Tips

It’s the official kick-off to the holiday season, first one up, Thanksgiving. Mmmm the turkey, ham, stuffing and desserts… is your mouth watering yet? While we’re over indulging on delicious foods with our extended family and friends, remember these tips so that your best friend(s) have a day to be thankful for also.

  • A Tired Dog is a Happy Dog: Before the house starts filling up with friends and family, go for a walk. Get your pups ya-ya’s out now. Besides, it will help you make more room for the great food your going to over indulge in!
  • Collar and Tags: As with any gathering, ensure that your pup has their bling on. Collar is on correctly and tags are up-to-date. You don’t want to spend the afternoon searching for a lost dog.
  • Turkey and Trimmings: I know, we all want to share a little and every once in a while that’s OK. Ensure that the turkey is fully cooked so that there is no salmonella bacteria and please, please make sure there are no bones. Turkey bones are small and can easily choke or hurt their stomach. Try putting some in a Kong or Busy Buddy and make the moment last, you’re pup will enjoy the food and the challenge.
  • Onions, Grapes, Raisins and Chocolate, Oh My!: Just because they are all ingredients that make the day and meal doesn’t mean they should be shared. All of the items listed are toxic to dogs and other pets and should not be shared.
  • Keep a Lid On It: The meal smells so good while cooking, it also smells so good to your best buddy in the trash. Keep a lid on it and avoid messes and embarrassing moments.
  • No Yappy Hours: While the Thanksgiving cocktails may be flowing two things you should always adhere to. 1. Don’t drink and drive and 2. Never leave your cocktails on the ground or in reach of your dogs or other pets, they are toxic.

Most of all, have fun, be thankful and enjoy time with your family and friends! Happy Thanksgiving from all of us here at DogGeek.com

November 11, 2018 |
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