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Why Does Your Dog Have an Upset Stomach?

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dog upset stomach

dog upset stomach

A DogGeek.com exclusive

Dog vomiting is a common daily occurrence for many dogs because of the very fast consumption of food by your pooch or may be because he ate something he shouldn’t have. But in some dogs, it may be an indication of any serious hidden illness.

Changing the meal schedule of your dog can be an easy fix to the problem if it isn’t anything serious. But in case this didn’t seem to work, be sure to get your dog good medical attention without any delay as he might have a serious underlying illness.

Frequent vomiting of your dog can lead to intestinal problems, extreme dehydration, and in worse cases, organ failure. It is essential that you do not ignore the vomiting of your dog if it exceeds the frequency of twice per hour, and take him to the vet immediately.

Reasons for Frequent Dog Vomiting

  • Intestinal parasites – These can lead to both diarrhea and vomiting in adult dogs and puppies. Dogs with illnesses, like flue are also known to have minor vomiting.
  • Higher stomach acid – If your dog vomits soon after his meals and the vomiting is yellow in color, it can suggest overproduction of acids and bile in your dog. Feeding small, frequent meals to your dog can help you correct this problem.
  • Food intolerance – At times, change in dog food can also lead to diarrhea and vomiting as your dog might be intolerant to certain ingredients of this new food. Beef, pork, fish, wheat, and salt are the common foods that can cause food intolerance.
  • Eating Grass – Although it is normal for dogs to eat grass but if your canine friend has eaten too much of grass, it may lead to vomiting.
  • Consuming Non-Food Items – It is natural for dogs to hog upon almost anything that they come across, including garbage, dead animals, plants, and others. Some of these items can be very dangerous when consumed by your dog. To eliminate this habit in dogs, you may want to buy dog supplies or toys to keep them occupied with harmless stuff.
  • Eating Human Food – Human foods that have a higher content of salt, sugar, and fat, should be given very sparingly to dogs. Frequent consumption of these foods can not only cause vomiting but also lead to chronic illnesses, like diabetes.
  • Hurried or Excessive Drinking or Eating – Drinking or eating hurriedly or in excessive quantities can cause your pooch to vomit soon after the meal. This is especially common among small breeds and puppies.
  • Illnesses – Diseases like cancers, canine parvo, and pancreatitis can also be the reasons for vomiting. Bacterial infections, ear infections, and tumors are also cited as one of the many reasons that can cause vomiting. For better diagnosis, it is essential that you observe the secondary symptoms and any change in behavior of your pooch, apart from vomiting.

What to Do When Your Dog is Vomiting Frequently?

If you suspect any illness, you should call your vet immediately. If your pooch has eaten any dead or spoiled animal by any chance, your vet will prescribe the necessary antibiotics. In some extreme cases, your pooch might need to be provided with an IV drip overnight to avoid any dehydration.

In mind vomiting cases, Pepto Bismol or Tylenol may be recommended by your vet. But it is important that you must NEVER give these to your furry friend, unless your vet consents for it first.
Any food should be kept away from your dog if he vomits frequently all through the day. Provide your dog with ice chips to make up for his hydration but don’t give him any fluids if your dog keeps vomiting or has diarrhea. After you’ve not given him water for 12 hours, begin introducing bland meals to him. This includes rice, boiled hamburger, or plain oatmeal. If your pooch stops vomiting in the next few days, you can re-introduce his normal dog food.

Brenda Lyttle is a dog lover and enjoys making Halloween costumes for dogs in her free time.

October 10, 2019 |

5 Halloween Safety Tips for Dogs

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Dog Halloween Safety Tips

Dog Halloween Safety Tips

Many years before dog-shaming.com took off people have shaming their dogs in Halloween costumes. I know… I know… but your dog likes it. Let’s face it, no one wants to be forcefully dressed up in clothes they didn’t pick out. Now, we’re not judging because we’ve put the fair share of costumes our dogs and still do. We’re just calling it what it is… CUTE! All fun put aside, please remember these safety tips so your pooch ghost is safe this Halloween!

  1. No matter how many tricks they do, no treats from the candy bowl! Chocolate, artificail sweetners and other candies are toxic to our best friends. if you do suspect that your dog has ingested something toxic, call your veterinarian or the ASPCA Animal Poison Control Center at 888-426-4435.
  2. Pumpkins may look great on the front porch, but open flames should never be around a pet. Try using flame shaped LED lights, you can easily find them at Target or other stores.
  3. Back to the costumes, if you’re going to do it make sure that your dog can walk, move and most importantly breathe in their costume.
  4. Don’t let them greet for the treats. During the time where trick-or-treaters are coming to the door, keep your dog in another room so that they can not dart out the door if they get scared. Most lost pets are lost during the holidays because of the distractions.
  5. Put an ID tag on them! In case they escape you want them to be able to come home. ID’s Only about 15% of dogs lost are reunited with their families. ID and microchipping is the best way to ensure that your best friend finds their way home.

And remember, have a great time!

 

 

October 2, 2019 |

Summer Safety For Dogs

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summer abba

summer abbaSummertime is here and that means lots of activities for you and your best friend but it also means chances for danger. While out and about with your dog this summer, remember these pet safety rules.

  • Never leave your dog in a car alone, even if the windows are down. 
    Even on a nice 80 degree day, your car can heat up over 100 degrees or more in 10 minutes. Dogs have heat strokes at 110 degrees. Cracking the window still does not allow enough ventilation for all the heat to escape and opening it too much will allow your dog the ability to jump out. If you can’t take your dog with you every where that you go, leave him at home. Trust us, he will appreciate it more.
  • Never put your dog in the back of a pickup truck without being in a crate properly restrained.
    Yes, we know he may “like” it, but it’s not safe. Dogs are easily distracted by many things, squirrels being one of the most popular items. You do no want your dog jumping out of the back of a moving vehicle. And do not use just a leash to keep them from jumping as your dog could hang themselves by accident. If your dog has to ride in the back, please crate them with the proper restraints and protection from the wind. Just like how you like being protected by the windshield, so do they.
  • Asphalt heats up quickly, protect your dog’s paws
    Black asphalt, as with any black items, heats up quickly in the sun light. Don’t walk your dog during the heat of the day and if you do, check the temperature of the asphalt. If it burns your hands it can burn the pads on their feet.
  • Ensure your dog has plenty of shade while outside
    If you must leave your dog outside for any amount of time, ensure that they have plenty of shade as to not get sunburned or over heated.
  • Keep their water fresh and full
    During the summer
    water evaporates fast and is a place where parasites can grow. Remember to replace their water daily and to keep it full so that your dog does not dehydrate.
  • Go to the groomer
    Imagine if you had to have a fur coat on all summer. While a dog’s hair does have built in heat management, they need help. Take yours to a dog groomer to get their undercoat brushed out so that the air can flow thru easily cooling your dog. Never shave down to the skin as their skin can burn just like yours.
  • Keep them on a leash
    We know, it’s summer and everyone wants to run free, but unless it’s an off leash dog park or your fenced back yard, always keep your best friend on a leash. It will help keep them from getting lost, getting into a fight with other dogs or being hit by a car.
  • Keep the cocktails and food on high ground
    Everyone loves a cookout, so does your dog.
    Remember that your dog doesn’t know which foods and drinks are good for them, they only know what smells good to them. Cocktails and beer can lead to alcohol poisoning fast.

Have fun this summer and be safe!

Find a dog park near you >>

July 5, 2019 |

Summertime Dangers for Dogs: Heat Stroke & Drowning

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Summertime Dangers for Dogs

Summertime Dangers for Dogs

Just because Labor Day is right around the corner, don’t stop being vigilant when it comes to keeping your dogs safe in the summer months. Here’s how to recognize and neutralize two potential dangers that your pet could face in summer:

Prevent Deadly Heat Stroke

Summer sun and temps won’t go away just because the calendar says September, especially in California and parts of the South and Southwest. With the glow of the sun comes high temperatures, and that intense heat can pose a danger to your pets, who can easily become overheated. Overheating could lead to heat stroke, which could be deadly to your pet. Here are some tips from the Central Oregon Veterinary Group on how to prevent heat stroke in dogs:

  1. Your dog can’t fill his own water bowl. Make sure he or she has an adequate supply.
  2. Never chain your pet in a spot where shade is not (or will not be) available.
  3. Never leave your pet inside the car while you leave for “just a minute.”
  4. Take your pet for walks during the cooler parts of the day.
  5. Head for the river! A dip in the stream will feel good for both of you.

Signs of heatstroke include excessive panting, pale gums, thick drool, and vomiting. Heat stroke is a serious condition and needs immediate attention, so if your dog is showing signs of any of these symptoms, call your veterinarian right away. In the meantime, provide your dog with cool (not cold!) drinking water and use a cool damp towel over his or her fur and belly to help draw out some of the body heat.

Prevent Swimming Pool Drownings

Among Americans’ favorite summertime activities is floating down a local river on inner tubes and rafts. Swimming, of course, is popular too. Many locals also retreat to their own backyard swimming pools, which is a convenience and a great source of entertainment, but also poses a potential hazard for dogs. If your dog jumps or falls into a pool of water, it may be difficult for him or her to get back out. Most dogs can tread water for a few hours, but once exhaustion sets in, they could drown. Dogs can be trained to get out of a pool on their own, but don’t count on yours knowing how to instinctively.

Ask your pool installer or vet about safety measures to prevent pet drownings. Visit PoolProducts.com and review the variety of safety products available. There are “skamper ramps” and dog safety life jackets available for purchase. Make your pool pet-friendly and rest with the peace of mind that your backyard is safe for your family and pets.

Be Wise, Have Fun and Keep Your Pet Safe

Don’t let concerns about heat stroke and drowning prevent you from having fun in the sun with your pets and loved ones. By taking simple preventative measures and keeping a close watch on the health and location of your pet, there are only good times ahead.

July 5, 2019 |

Summer Pet Safety Tips

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summer dog

summer dogWarm weather is here and it’s time to start thinking about your pet’s safety. Here’s a list of some safety tips to keep your best friend(s) happy and enjoying the summer fun:

  • Never leave animals alone in the car. Even when it’s only 70 degrees outside, your car can reach 90 degrees on the inside within 10 minutes greatly increasing the risk of heat stroke.
  • Repeat… Never leave animals alone in the car. Even if you leave it running! Your dog could accidentally put the car in gear or cause other damage.
  • Think about your dog’s feet when walking. A 77 degree day means that the asphalt on the street is 125 degrees if it’s sunny outside. We know you don’t want to walk barefoot on that, neither do they! Try taking a walk in the early morning before it heats up.
  • Make sure there is pleanty of water. Dogs cannot cool themselves by sweating like we do. Panting is the only option they have. Make sure there is access to cool, clean water to drink.
  • Fleas, ticks and mosquitoes abound when it’s warm out. Make sure your pet is protected as to not get heart worms, lyme disease or others.
  • Read the label on that yard treatment. Although everyone wants a nice green yard with no weeds, the treatment you put down may poison your pet. Read the label to ensure it is safe.
  • Ensure tags are up-to-date and readable. Summertime is when everyone is outside and the chances for a dog to get out increase. To help them get back to you quickly, make sure tags are up to date with your mobile number.
  • Plan ahead for vacations. If Fido is going with you, make sure to book dog friendly hotels in advance so they are not full. If they are not going, make sure a dog sitter or kennel is booked. No one wants to cancel a vacation at the last minute because Fido doesn’t have a place to go.
  • Get rid of the winter coats. You put your’s away, so should they. Shedding is natural and helps remove some of the winter fur, but your best friend could use some help. Shaving is never a good option since it opens their skin up to burning but a good dog grooming will help rmove the excess fur.
July 4, 2019 |

Hot Weather Tips for Dogs

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summer weather tips

summer weather tips

When temperatures rise so do the dangers for your dogs. Follow these hot weather safety tips to ensure your best friend has a great summer.

  • Never, ever leave your dog in a parked car when it’s over 60 degrees. When it’s 72 outside, a car’s temperature can jump to 116 even with the windows cracked.
  • Always have pleanty of fresh, clean water accessible.
  • Ensure that there is shade to cool of under if your dog is outside for an extended amount of time.
  • If you run or job with your dog make sure to take frequent breaks. Also remember that asphalt and concret get hot quickly and can burn the pads on dog’s feet.
  • When the weather is dangerously hot remember to keep your dog inside.
  • Remember to give flea, tick and heartworm prevention medication as the warm months are prime time to spread each.

Remember most of all that summer is a time to enjoy so make sure you enjoy with your best friend.

July 3, 2019 |
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